Now is the time to get ready for your new global market

These are unprecedented times for all of us. With the economy giving no signs of a quick and steady recovery, business is becoming increasingly hard to predict. At least that’s what the experts say.

In reality, what they mean is that business-as-usual is becoming increasingly challenging to predict. Because your customers are still out there, and so are their needs. What is changing is how they make their buying decisions and how (or where) they enjoy your service or product.

The current situation has produced an unseen peak in online content consumption across the globe, driving an increasing number of interactions from offline into the online realm. The Internet has become a significant business delivery channel even for industries traditionally bound to physical presence – think yoga studios or museums, for instance. We wager that this trend will continue long after the movement restrictions have been lifted.

So what does this mean for your business? 

Well, it can mean good news. With more and more of life’s activities consumed remotely, your business is less bound to be physically present in the local market. Therefore, it’s a perfect opportunity to reconsider your customer geography – who will your business be targeting after the slowdown. Now more than ever, it’s time to plug into that The World is My Market mindset.

In this new reality, there are some new ground rules you should consider, however. A more global audience means having to deal with a variety of new cultures. The key success factor will be your ability to address customer needs and create value around your brand locally. Having your corporate or e-commerce website in English will not be enough. Pitching your prospects with marketing collaterals that don’t resonate with the local culture will result in fewer leads and fewer sales.

In other words, you need to walk the walk in the local culture, or else your message will get lost amidst the plethora of content out there.

If you want to be ready for this new reality arising after the slowdown, you need to start investing in creating localized content now. Translating and culturally adapting your marketing and sales materials should become an integral part of your business strategy, not a nice-to-have marketing perk.

Luckily, you won’t need to set up regional teams or offices to help you create your content locally – we’ve got your covered there. With our global team of expert linguists and content strategists, we take your message and recreate it so that it gets heard and acknowledged in the local culture. Drop us a line or give us a call, and we’ll be happy to walk you through the details.

Global Technical Skills: Keeping the Secure, Secure in Localized Government

Security is important for everyone, but for those working in government organizations, it can literally mean the difference between life and death. Intelligence agencies, military intelligence, and government agencies deal with highly secure information on a daily basis and each person with access to this data constitutes an additional risk to the safety and security of the information they are accessing, and to the lives of the people they need to protect. In an international environment, where content is translated to and from English with language pairs all over the world, there is an even greater risk of leaks unless those in charge of security take measures to protect the information. This blog will give recommendations on protecting your data security, especially when you are working with outside resources to manage your content translation.

One of the first questions you need to ask when you are working with a translation project is what level of security does it require? For the most secure documents, many organizations will source translations internally, which means if there is a staff translator who is a native speaker of the target language and can translate the document accurately and on secure internal networks, this work will be done at the office. In most cases, these individuals will need to have security clearances, so make sure you know who is touching your content and what clearances they have. When the security needs are not so extensive as to require an internal resource or security clearance, you will want the assurance that the translation service provider you choose takes appropriate precautions to keep your data safe.

There are a number of ways to investigate the security of your supplier. One is to ask who, both among the employees of their company and the contractors, will have access to your data and where this access will take place. You can request that the translators and the project manager work in specific offices with network security, even onsite at your location, and that there is no way for data to fall into the wrong hands. Another tip for people concerned about security is to request that all contractors or employees who work with your content sign NDAs or umbrella NDAs which specifically reference your project and any extra security requirements. Lastly, you will want to make sure that the translation service provider has taken quality management precautions as certified by the ISO 9001 family of certifications:

“This standard is based on a number of quality management principles including a strong customer focus, the motivation and implication of top management, the process approach and continual improvement. These principles are explained in more detail in the pdf Quality Management Principles. Using ISO 9001:2015 helps ensure that customers get consistent, good quality products and services, which in turn brings many business benefits.”

Source (https://www.iso.org/iso-9001-quality-management.html)

LingPerfect Translations has been ISO 9001:2015 certified since 2013. We would be happy to discuss the details of the certification with you as well as any security issues you may have with your content translation services.